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Will the Global Pandemic Forever Change the Industry?

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July 1, 2020

How will the global pandemic that has rocked the entertainment sector forever change our industry as we begin to reopen the economy?

Let’s first look to the past to understand how the world survived the deadliest modern pandemic.

The 1918 “Spanish Flu” infected nearly 1/3 of the world population in three separate waves between 1918-1919 with an estimated fatality rate of 2%.  The first reported case was at Camp Funston in Fort Riley, Kansas in March 1918.  The H1N1 was considered “novel” meaning it was so new at the time there was no immunity built up in the human race.  The lack of antibiotics, poor hygiene, crowded living conditions and the fact that we were in the tail end of World War I all helped spread the virus globally.  In an effort to curb the spread, tactics like isolation, quarantine, disinfectants, limiting public gathers and wearing masks were all implemented – sound familiar?  It was coined “crowding control” back then.  During the 1918 pandemic masks were suggested to be worn for up to 2 years.  It also affected everyone but strangely killed the healthiest people.  Also, viruses weren’t discovered until the 1930’s so the term virus was none existent.  The pandemic ended in the summer of 1919 with those infected either dying or having developed an immunity.  With the end of the Great War and the global pandemic came the roaring 20’s and people need to socialize!  The economy grew 42% during this time.

Fast forward a 100 years.

Before our current pandemic, the US economy was at an all-time high and unemployment was low.  As the outbreak was increasing in other countries of the world technology allowed us to see its impacts unfold (whether accurate or not).  Technology might have been able to be used to help us not repeat the past.  Several factors may have helped – truthful accurate reporting, listening to scientists and medical professionals, and defining the priority. Social distancing is better defined as physical distancing because we are still connected even during lockdown.  Staying in touch feeds the human connection that we all need.  What is missing is the emotional connection that comes from being in the physical presence of a group.

How will we react after our current outbreak?  Will we have another cultural renaissance or will consumers be leery to get out and spend?  The shelter in place restriction was long enough to force new habits.  But if history tells us anything about humanity, once we navigate through a pandemic, people tend to run from isolation to some form of mega-socialization.

So how do we prepare for what is hopefully another explosion of spending?  What are some key factors that consumers will require in order to jump-start your business?  A few suggestions that can lead to a positive comeback.

1. BRAND LOVE

  • Brand love is more important than ever in our current times. We are creatures of habit and tend to be drawn to things we know. Steve Bryant of Article Group quoted “People care about what they already care about.”
  • Cultivating passionate fans takes positive emotional connection and self-brand integration.
  • To create superfans you must master the power of your story – shape the narrative.
  • Respect your customer

2. BUILD TRUST

  • You must consider the four dimensions of trust
      1. Physical – do I feel safe? Use design to emphasize safety.
      2. Emotional – can I trust that you are being honest? Communication is paramount.
      3. Digital – can I believe that all my information is secure? Use technology to safeguard data.
      4. Financial – can I accept that my economic concerns are being served? Understand your customers are the most important commodity.

3. LEVERAGE TECHNOLOGY

  • We are in an app world, use it to elevate your business.
  • Technology can drive efficiencies and productivity.
  • Use technology to elevate your customers experience.

4. SET TRENDS

  • Identify and prioritize revenue opportunities.
  • Purpose driven customer playbooks – understand your customer needs and build a scalable process.
  • Reservation/concierge will be important – create new interaction points for customers.
  • Openness is more important than ever – evaluate you current conditions and modify.
  • Control your guest flow through imaginative design not barriers – build on the experience.
  • Safety first.

5. OPERATIONAL EFFICIENCIES

  • Design efficiently, apply your money to enhance the customer experience.
  • Doing more with less.
  • Identify profit centers – exploit these areas with signage, branding and design.
  • Staffing efficiencies, utilize technology and purposeful design.
  • Offer less choices but make sure you do it exceptionally.

The increase in economics after each recession period is great.  Understand where the market opportunity is and size your opportunity correctly.  For the entertainment sector everything will feel new again.  You get to shape the story on how your business will succeed.  Be prepared as a company for speed and agility – we must learn quickly, constantly be pivoting and adjusting.  Hard times build character and difficult times will bring market openings to strong companies.

Albert Einstein said it best, “The same thinking that has led you to where you are is not going to lead you to where you want to go.”

Chad H. Philhour


Founded in 1981, TK Architects is a full-service architectural firm that offers all professional design services in-house to simplify and streamline coordination, including: Architecture, Interior Design, Graphic Design, Structural Engineering, Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing Engineering. The firm’s focus is entertainment architecture and engineering, including cinema, bowling, bars/lounges, food service, and entertainment centers worldwide. TK Architects provides the right services at the right time to meet client’s specific needs, including: New Buildings, Tenant Interiors, Renovations, Facility Upgrades, and Maintenance.


For more information about TK Architects please visit www.tkarch.com or contact Jack C. Muffoletto, at jcmuffoletto@tkarch.com

 

COVID, Design, and Father’s Day

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COVID, Design, and Father’s Day

 

We are now back to work in our office and abiding by CDC guidelines and local governmental declarations. Our workstation layout is already naturally spread out for the 6’-0” social distancing recommendation. Certain rooms get new rules like conference rooms and the kitchen for limited amounts of people, masks, hand sanitizer, and distancing. Our challenge is that we encourage a tight-knit culture built on face to face collaboration. This causes a disruption of the status quo of how an architectural / engineering firm functions. Fortunately, we have elements in place for virtual collaboration; fast internet and cloud-based platforms. The cloud-based tools are real-time collaboration tools where users can add comments and annotations. We rely less on printed drawings and instead can perform digitized sketch design for sharing both in the office and virtually. In all, we have leveraged our technology to work differently and safely.

 

To help our clients, it is our job to manipulate designs to make the paying customers feel safe and welcome. In these times, the customer’s comfort level extends beyond what is visual. Because of this, the clients are forced to put new programs in place. Technology seems to be the leading charge with more reliance on mobile phones, contactless motion-activated sensors, and the like. As architects, we are committed to safety without sacrificing the experience. For example, how do we adopt technology along with social distancing practices that don’t feel forced? How do we maintain spacing concerns without making people feel isolated or as if they aren’t allowed to have human-to-human contact?

On that note, after a late breakfast on Father’s Day, we packed coolers and went to the neighborhood pool to enjoy the day. When we got to our socially distanced lounge chairs it was like being in a different world, yet a world that was vaguely familiar. Children playing, people drinking, eating, and laughing. It was a wonderful day. But more than that, it confirmed something I have believed during this entire pandemic. The world is not going to change as much as some people think. People want to go out to eat, socialize in bars, travel, conduct business, seek out experiences, etc. In fact, many people will do this the first chance they get. It is such an important part of who we are. The memories we make with family. The connections we make with business colleagues. The much needed breaks we crave. People adapt quickly. Some faster than others, but we adapt together. It has been a devasting time for our industry but my Father’s Day outing gave me much hope that recovery is closer than we may think. Let’s hope so.

– Jack Muffoletto


Founded in 1981, TK Architects is a full-service architectural firm that offers all professional design services in-house to simplify and streamline coordination, including: Architecture, Interior Design, Graphic Design, Structural Engineering, Mechanical, Electrical and Plumbing Engineering. The firm’s focus is entertainment architecture and engineering, including cinema, bowling, bars/lounges, food service and entertainment centers worldwide. TK Architects provides the right services at the right time to meet client’s specific needs, including: New Buildings, Tenant Interiors, Renovations, Facility Upgrades and Maintenance.


For more information about TK Architects please visit www.tkarch.com or contact Jack C. Muffoletto, at jcmuffoletto@tkarch.com

 

THE BROTHERS BIMm

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THE NEW DAWN

When I began my adventure into architecture, the tools of the day were pens, pencils, erasers, razor blades (the original undo button), vellum drawing boards, and parallel squares. There was no magic in the background other than experience and mentoring. Our information sources were our mentors or the physical libraries located in our city offices. Faxes and chorded phones were the cutting edge of technology for communicating and transferring information quickly.

Not even the Brothers Grimm could have foretold such technical magic that was to come. Who could have fantasied about the brave digital age ahead and how it would reshape architectural production and coordination, forever?

Efficiencies in production were slow to adopt early releases of CAD software, in addition to being limited on computing power. However, as technology developed, it became apparent that there were real production advantages to be uncovered. The evolution of communication through technology has been a constant driver in the continued improvement in collaboration across disciplines and parties. In a short period of time, we have gone from fax-to email-to Revit and CAD computer software and cloud-based resources and apps like BIM-360. Working together is extremely quick and effective across the board. TK Architects uses BIM 360 for communication and site sharing capabilities as well as:

  • Provide a reliable, one source location for all project teams to secure online file management in Revit
  • Secure automatic back-up and historical retrieval of previous iterations of a developing Revit model
  • Security against internal hardware failures such as viruses, networks, and hard drive corruption; all that can lead to a great loss of product produced, product to be redone.and downtime.
  • Built-in document review, markup and instant sharing of these with our teams
  • The ability to allow regulated access to files for our clients, vendors, and contractors

 

A BRAVE NEW WORLD

As a benefit to our clients, TK strives to be at the cutting edge of technology, using advanced software like Autodesk Dynamo. Dynamo is used to automate repetitive, time-consuming, and often laborious tasks that often in the past could generate minor inconsistencies. This allows us to provide a higher quality, more efficient, and accurate product while allowing us to focus on the larger scale scope and coordination issues associated with just about any complex project.

There is a new kind of architect and engineer, one with equal doses of digital, hands-on team collaboration, and ingenuity.

 

WHAT DEVELOPMENTS ARE TO COME?

What can you imagine? VR building of the model, as if hands-on? What will be the extent of 3D printing in construction? What wonders and opportunities for new structures, materials, efficiency will be available to us all. We see man vendors and companies from all fields implementing these tools in order to bring the client into the project and model as early as possible, allowing them to sample the space being created.

 

EPILOGUE (actually, it’s just the beginning)

I have been in the industry for over 30 years and love it with a passion every day. That passion is fanned by many of the new BIM developments in technology that are allowing us to increase efficiency and quality while freeing us up to spend time on things like design.

 

– Ian Wilson

 


Founded in 1981, TK Architects is a full-service architectural firm that offers all professional design services in-house to simplify and streamline coordination, including: Architecture, Interior Design, Graphic Design, Structural Engineering, Mechanical, Electrical and Plumbing Engineering. The firm’s focus is entertainment architecture and engineering, including cinema, bowling, bars/lounges, food service and entertainment centers worldwide. TK Architects provides the right services at the right time to meet client’s specific needs, including: New Buildings, Tenant Interiors, Renovations, Facility Upgrades and Maintenance.


For more information about TK Architects please visit www.tkarch.com or contact Jack C. Muffoletto, at jcmuffoletto@tkarch.com

Experiential Architecture

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What is “Experiential Architecture” and how does it relate to the Cinema Industry?

WIKIPEDIA outlines Experience architecture (XA) as the art of articulating a clear user story or journey through information architecture, interaction design or experience design that an end-user navigates across products and services offered by the client or as intended by the designer.

If this is true, all cinemas could or maybe should be considered experiential architecture.

Cinema is defined as the art of simulating experiences to communicate ideas, stories, perceptions, feelings, beauty or atmosphere through the use of recorded imagery and sound.  If we expand the ideas of what is being portrayed on the screen to what could be experienced in your facility the potential to create experiences is limitless.  We know architecture has an emotional impact on humans, the question is what kind of emotions do you want to create for your users?  How can we collaborate to create memories?  Experiential architecture is design that evolves and responds over time, the notion of a holistic approach to the design.  If architecture can connect emotionally with its occupants, then the message can be felt more deeply thus more readily leaving a lasting impression on your customers.

Designing for the traditional senses:  sight (vision), hearing (audition), taste (gustation), smell (olfaction) and touch (somatosensation). If you pay close attention while designing to sensory components the result will create an environment that is felt and memorable.  Maybe memory is the other sense we need to capture?  Perhaps it is out of these components that a great building can simply stimulate someone into making a decision.  Consumers identify their wants and needs, collect information, evaluate options and make decisions to purchase all of which are influenced by environmental factors some of which we can influence through design.  Customer experience from product, service, content, touchpoints, pricing, facility, sensory engagement which should all be considered and described in the design.  Does the design express a coherent platform for the experience?  Do the experiences complement and enhance each other or do they conflict and detract from each other?

Experience starts as you approach your destination and the approach forms the path of preparation for the customer.  This can start as early as when patrons log on to your website or enter the parking lot of your facility.  It all relates to the complete approach of creating a memorable experience for your guests.  One that they want to choose again and again.

Design Factors

Path

What kind of path do you want to create for your customers?

Straight path, path around spaces, free path, path through spaces, transitional path, changing vistas along a path – the path provides the opportunity for interaction between spaces.  Knowing your preferences allows designers the ability to help create the correct path to better suit your business model and generate more revenue from the end-users.  For instance, if we know your model is to capture revenue from the patrons in the lobby by passing a multitude of options one might create a layout that resembles a casino floor.  However, if your goal is to get the patron in the theatre seat so they can begin ordering food and beverage, we might design a central corridor that leads directly to the auditorium door.  Different design elements are needed along these paths to generate the intended experience.

Space

Spatial experience is the visual perception at the human eye level.  Items placed above or below this level may be perceived differently.  It is similar to a path, movement through horizontal space is very different than movement through vertical space.  So it is very important for the design to keep the experience moving by shifting the visual axis along a horizontal path.  The use of barriers or obstacles provides areas to rest or contemplate which may be essential for impulse purchasing.  Architecture can compose the whole experience through the perception of space and the space becomes alive giving your customer a sense of presence in your facility.

Color

Colors of interior walls can influence the imagination.  Every color elicits a different and unique emotional response with its viewer (this is also very dependent on culture):

  • Yellow gives the impression of bright and intense, as people associate it with the sun.
  • Red evokes accuracy and attention to detail since people associate red with danger, which makes you more alert.
  • Blue creates a relaxed state allowing the imagination to roam since we associate blue with the ocean and sky.
  • Green suggests nature and organic quality, it is the most balanced color which equates to stability.
  • White expresses openness, with a message of purity and sterile.

*Each specific color can change when modified in their lightness factor and saturation (light to dark).

Building Components

  • Ceiling heights also affect how we think, low ceilings help focus one’s thoughts while high ceiling promote free thinking.  It’s the difference between “item-specific” versus “relational” processing.
  • Flooring materials impact how we navigate through spaces.  Carpet can increase the duration of people’s gathering time. 
  • Lighting (both natural and artificial) affects mood.  Sunlight improves memory, dim lighting helps people relax.
  • Furniture impacts socialization.  Furniture organized in small groupings encourages interaction.  Semi-circle arrangements increase participation. Straight-line configurations encourage independence.

The spaces around us can influence and enhance our daily lives.  Considering the design as a major component to enhance the overall experience thus creating memorable experiences will create greater value for your users.  Giving the customer more than expected through experiential architecture makes it easier to consume and spend at a higher price point.  A similar model for coffee purchased from Starbucks versus McDonald’s – atmosphere and creativity matter more than ever to consumers in today’s society obsessed with consumption.

Experiential architecture is on the rise and today’s consumers demand emotional connections.  Movies are emotionally driven so leverage that cinematic experience on the screen to your facilities architecture to shape the customers’ experience.  Human-centric design is paramount to your brand’s story, and good collaborative design will make your facility a preferred destination point.


– Chad H. Philhour

 


Founded in 1981, TK Architects is a full-service architectural firm that offers all professional design services in-house to simplify and streamline coordination, including: Architecture, Interior Design, Graphic Design, Structural Engineering, Mechanical, Electrical and Plumbing Engineering. The firm’s focus is entertainment architecture and engineering, including cinema, bowling, bars/lounges, food service and entertainment centers worldwide. TK Architects provides the right services at the right time to meet client’s specific needs, including: New Buildings, Tenant Interiors, Renovations, Facility Upgrades and Maintenance.


For more information about TK Architects please visit www.tkarch.com or contact Jack C. Muffoletto, at jcmuffoletto@tkarch.com

It’s a Brick (movie) House……

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Malco Powerhouse at Main St.

Sustainability is a common theme we hear repeatedly in the news and in our profession.  As an architectural engineering design firm, we enthusiastically promote the adaptive reuse of structures over a complete teardown and starting over.  For clients, it is a romantic endeavor to bring an existing structure back to its original glory.  We see this everywhere in the US including all around our office in downtown Kansas City, MO.  From experience, the romance can be oversimplified as the effort is a big investment in time, cost, and learning, as each project is original with its own set of unique challenges.

Located in the redeveloping South Main Historic District near downtown Memphis, the new Malco Powerhouse Cinema is a project that combines and incorporates a former 1914 railyard brick-clad power station into a unique gathering place that includes a premium 7 screen boutique cinema. The original power station was constructed by the Illinois Central railway to provide steam and electric power to the central station located across the tracks.  Restoration of key historical elements of the existing powerhouse was essential for the building’s historic preservation.  Strict oversight was provided by the State Historic Preservation Office to monitor and maintain the look of the building.  The old historic 60’ tall smokestack was preserved. Hundreds of small panes of glass were replaced in the existing steel windows. Tons of existing brick was salvaged and reused repeatedly throughout the existing building.  There were two different types of brick: an unfinished brick for interior use and a finished brick for the exterior. 

 

 

Undoubtedly the beauty of the powerhouse was the brick.  The brick was unique not just in color but also in dimension and edge profile.  It had aged very well and the construction detailing 100 years ago was beautiful.  Malco wanted to keep or reuse as much of the brick as possible.  The Memphis Historic Preservation Committee also wanted as much of the existing brick and structure to remain to maintain the history and beauty of the past in the gentrifying area.  The challenge was that the structure and configuration of the old building was not capable of supporting a state-of-the-art auditorium-based layout.  However, with some creative thinking the old edifice was incorporated for ticketing, dining and as a gathering area.

TK worked with Malco to create an environment that would meet the requirements of the historical committee for preservation, while still fulfilling the needs of Malco as an operational space for the new theatre.  The decision was made to emphasize the beauty of the powerhouse and have it as the main entry point.  A “lean-to parts shed” existed on the south side of the building and was removed to expose the main structural wall.  This façade would become the new focal point for blending old and new as people entered the building.

 

The brick from this lean-to was salvaged to be reused at other locations in the project.  Each brick had to be removed by hand.  Every brick was going to be needed including the broken ones.  Approximately 1,500 finished exterior brick and 1,500 unfinished interior brick were reused throughout the project.  The new entrance to the lobby and the ticket booth reused the finished brick while the unfinished brick was used around the fireplace, entrances, and the transition space from the seating area to the concession area.

 

There are many unique and beautiful aspects to the renovated powerhouse, but if you ever happen to visit, be sure to take a special look at the rebuilt pilaster at the box office.  With the removal of the south wall, which was providing the load path in the event of a seismic event, a built-up steel portal frame was created to resist the loading while still being minimal in size.  This allowed the contractor to cover the frame with the painstakingly salvaged brick, creating a beautiful backdrop for the box office and entry to the lounge.  The new craftsmanship blends into the existing and you can’t tell where the original building transitions to new.

As with any renovation, there were many challenges; some expected and some not so much.  A lot of passionate people made this project happen.  Now you can enjoy the experience that you just can’t get except in a building that is more than a century old. 

 

 

Jack Muffoletto


Founded in 1981, TK Architects is a full-service architectural firm that offers all professional design services in-house to simplify and streamline coordination, including: Architecture, Interior Design, Graphic Design, Structural Engineering, Mechanical, Electrical and Plumbing Engineering. The firm’s focus is entertainment architecture and engineering, including cinema, bowling, bars/lounges, food service and entertainment centers worldwide. TK Architects provides the right services at the right time to meet client’s specific needs, including: New Buildings, Tenant Interiors, Renovations, Facility Upgrades and Maintenance.


For more information about TK Architects please visit www.tkarch.com or contact Jack C. Muffoletto, at jcmuffoletto@tkarch.com